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uuga
Posts: 1 | Points: 3 | Last online: 07.12.2018
Date registered
07.08.2018
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      • uuga has uploaded a new picture 07.09.2018
    • uuga has written a new post "I killed a man with a marble in a family dollar." 07.09.2018

      Not saying you should overly blame yourself since it was really a freak accident, but I don't think anyone can argue it was not in some way your fault. You tossed the marble and that ultimately was the catalyst that ended his life.
      Sorry for sounding harsh but I'm just looking at this objectively. I remember those bags of marbles as a kid too, but I never tossed them around in public; was never a mischievous kid and always had a high sense of propriety. Again, not blaming you but it's not fair for everyone to say it's not your fault.
      tl;dr no marble = no death downvote me all you want, but you can't denounce the simple truth it boils down to.
      This is not the same as a kid waving to a trucker and causing an accident. This is more like a kid left alone in the car and releases the E-break allowing the car to roll down the hill and run over someone. Fault lies with the parent and/or kid. Mom should have been watching more closely; negligence should be on her conscience not yours.
      Final note, good on you for telling your mom. Not sure what I would have done in her place, but I think we can all agree it's much easier to tell a child he imagined it rather than deal with the repercussions of that action.

    • uuga has written a new blog article "Monstrosity by Tim Curran – an Overlooked Gem" 07.09.2018


      I recently taught Tim Curran’s MONSTROSITY in a college-level introductory lit course — literally titled “Monstrosities.” The book exhibits Curran’s wildly playful imagination when set free and allowed to take inventive extremes. I don’t want to spoil any surprises, because this is a book where you begin to turn the pages dying to see what crazy creature will be unleashed next, and whether or not the author will be able to top the one you just read about, with your jaw on the floor. There are scenes in the book that will stick with me as truly frightening for a long time — two, especially (an early one where Frank gets stuck in, oh, let’s call it a hammock, and another one where the protagonist and his romantic interest get stuck in the equivalent of a house-sized Venus Fly Trap). The only weaknesses of this novel, really, are all about the plot: the action/adventure and rescue plots felt too simple and a bit predictable at times to me, but they allowed the monsters and the surprising revelations they harbored to dominate, which I enjoyed immensely. As a post-apocalyptic kaiju kind of story, it really works well and Curran just has a lot of fun. There’s a lot of extreme gore, but it avoids the excesses of similar “extreme horror” fiction (I think — not sure, because I’m kind of numb to it all), and he handles everything supremely well. The changes he dramatized — embodied by “The Food” — are really described in evocative ways. The book doesn’t belabor the ecological nightmare that the theme implies, and I would have liked much more depth to that, but the characters make up for it and what all this means for Frank and his family relations is all worth musing over. An enjoyable, ORIGINAL book and I recommend it for anyone who is looking for a well-written, action packed, modern-day horror story. And my students, for the most part, would whole-heartedly agree.
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